Posting guidelines

This forum is for sharing your Reason creations with the rest of the community. If you post a song expecting feedback please take time to leave some for others.
Forum rules
Remember to begin your thread subject with a genre, ie.: (Hiphop) New instrumental
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Kenni
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Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

Post 10 Jul 2015

Hi there,

To make it easier for the users of this forum to identify music that fits their likings, I would like to ask you all to "tag" your threads with a genre in the future.

Topic example:

Drunk in the morning

becomes

(Hiphop) Drunk in the morning

See it more as an unwritten rule to make it easier for your fellow forum users. :cool:
Kenni Andruszkow
SoundCloud

User avatar
Emerton
Posts: 117
Joined: 18 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

Kenni wrote:Hi there,

To make it easier for the users of this forum to identify music that fits their likings, I would like to ask you all to "tag" your threads with a genre in the future.

Topic example:

Drunk in the morning

becomes

(Hiphop) Drunk in the morning

See it more as an unwritten rule to make it easier for your fellow producers. :cool:
And what about artists? Do we have any "fellow self-produced artists" here? Or is everyone a so-called "producer" (who only produce their own music)?

If the person you're producing is yourself, you're not a producer, you're a self-produced artist.

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motuscott
Posts: 1184
Joined: 16 Jan 2015
Location: the new york

Post 10 Jul 2015

Afternoonly drunk, but agree wholeheartedly
in an alt art rock kind of way
Sometimes a cigar is just a synth that's on fire

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eusti
Posts: 2108
Joined: 15 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

Emerton wrote:
And what about artists? Do we have any "fellow self-produced artists" here? Or is everyone a so-called "producer" (who only produce their own music)?

If the person you're producing is yourself, you're not a producer, you're a self-produced artist.
Really, we're going to argue about the definition of "producers" now?
How about people who produce music as in create music?
And does that even matter?

D.

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Kenni
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Posts: 1191
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Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

Post 10 Jul 2015

Emerton wrote:And what about artists? Do we have any "fellow self-produced artists" here? Or is everyone a so-called "producer" (who only produce their own music)?

If the person you're producing is yourself, you're not a producer, you're a self-produced artist.
Fixed.

I stand corrected. Or something. :wtf:
Kenni Andruszkow
SoundCloud

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eusti
Posts: 2108
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Post 10 Jul 2015

You are a genius, Kenni! Hat's off to you! :)

D.

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Emerton
Posts: 117
Joined: 18 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

eusti wrote: Really, we're going to argue about the definition of "producers" now?
Yeah, why not?
eusti wrote: How about people who produce music as in create music?
And does that even matter?
D.
What context?
A dude who composes songs? A songwriter.
A person who creates lyrics to songs? A lyricist.
A person who plays an instrument and improvises? An instrumentalist.
A person who creates music scores and instrumental pieces? A composer.
A person who creates rhythms and drum patterns? A beatmaker, a percussionist or a drummer.
A person who uses their voice to create music? A singer.
A person of technical skill who captures any performances from any of the above? An engineer.
A global term for a person who creates music in any or all of these capacities? A music creator.
A person who assembles any or all these people together to produce a master recording within a defined budget?
A RECORD PRODUCER

It's called "The English language" it would be good to speak it properly.

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Emerton
Posts: 117
Joined: 18 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

https://www.careersinmusic.com/record-producer/

Become a Record Producer
Career Description
The Record Producer has one of the most sought-after careers in the music business, and works to get an album produced. Of course, they are always striving (and hoping!) to have each album turn out to be a chart-topping success. With that goal in mind, the Record Producer has a lot on his or her plate in terms of responsibility. For one thing, they help Recording Artists choose which songs they’ll record for a given album. Then they’ll select a studio and book the proper amount of recording time. From there, the Record Producer will work with a Music Arranger and an Audio Engineer, and will also need to find Background Vocalists to assist with the songs.

Once the studio recording starts, the Record Producer works closely with an Engineer, who helps him or her find or achieve certain specific sounds or feelings to portray through the music. This process will usually continue throughout the entire studio session, as the Record Producer will inject their personal opinions on just how each song would sound best. It’s important to note, though, that the Record Producer has to keep an eye on the budget. Recording time is not cheap, and if he or she ends up spending more than the allotted amount, the record label or Artist could be on the hook for thousands of extra dollars.

After each song is recorded, the Record Producer is usually the person who then mixes it into its final version. This isn’t always the case, though, as sometimes special Engineers or Mixers are hired to perform this job. When that happens, the Record Producer still supervises the mixing process, as it’s such an important aspect of creating an album. Even at this point, the Record Producer still has plenty of work to do. Many times, an entire album is recorded in the studio, complete with songs that don’t end up making the final cut. Part of the Record Producer’s job is to help choose which songs make the final album and which don’t. They’ll also help decide what order the songs will play in throughout the album (i.e. the songs’ track numbers). The Record Producer will also be a part of selecting which songs will be promoted and sold as singles.

As you can see, the Record Producer is heavily involved with every single step and detail of creating an album. Even when the creative process comes to an end, the Record Producer’s responsibilities certainly do not. There is still licensing to be worked on, as well as copyright issues, and consent forms and releases from Artists, Engineers, Photographers, and pretty much anyone else who receives credit for their work on a given album. Once all of that is complete, the Record Producer submits receipts and bills to the record label.

Certain Record Producers work as employees for record labels, reporting to the A&R department head (get your A&R contacts list). Others work independently as freelancers, and and may be contractors for either an Artist or a record label.

Salary
When working on staff at a record company, Record Producers generally earn a base salary, along with royalties from records they produce. If they are freelancing for the record company, they will still usually earn royalties, but they’ll command a fee instead of a salary. Record Producers that have a proven track record of success can negotiate larger royalty payments, usually in advance.

Staff Record Producers can earn anywhere from $25,000 to $75,000 or more per year, while very successful independent Producers may earn up to $1,000,000 or more annually.

Employment
Every single album that is sold has a Record Producer attached to it, though sometimes that Producer can be a member of the band, or even the Staff Engineer. Some albums will even require more than one Producer to complete the job. For these reasons, there are quite a few possibilities for employment within the record production specialty, but due to the nature of the position, it can be difficult to get a foot in the door.

Advancement
Once a Record Producer proves his or her ability to produce hit records, they can eventually move on to working with more prestigious Artists. This can lead to a position at a larger record label, where they can command an even larger salary. Of course this creates a nice cycle of success, as they can now work with even better well-known Artists, and become even more in demand as a Record Producer.

Education and Training
Many Record Producers do have college or music school degrees. However, obtaining a degree is not a prerequisite. Some instead opt to attend sound recording schools in order to learn about the entire recording process. For an aspiring Record Producer, any knowledge of the music business is useful and important, whether obtained through experience or formal education.

Experience, Skills, and Personality
The most important skill for a Record Producer to have is the ability to select hit records to produce. As they begin to get a reputation as someone who can do this, they’ll find themselves in high demand with more and more prestigious Artists and bands. But in order to make that happen, Record Producers need to have an intense interest in music, as well as an “ear” for something special in an Artist or an idea. This is tougher than it sounds, as they are usually listening to raw talent, and what it might later sound like after professional production is left to the imagination.

Unions and Associations
Record Producers can become members of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS), which is the association that gives out Grammy awards each year. The Country Music Association (CMA) and the Gospel Music Association (GMA) are other music associations Record Producers might also belong to.

Suggestions for Getting Started
Search for any job that will give you experience working in the recording studio, like Floor Manager, Assistant Audio Engineer, Receptionist, or Audio Recording Engineer.
Find a group or Artist who has a song they want to record and put some of your own money into producing it. Then try to sell the record and the Artist to a record label.
Check for apprenticeships with recording studios or record companies in order to learn new skills.

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Emerton
Posts: 117
Joined: 18 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

As per the above, if you're not producing an artist who is not you, you're not a producer. If you're the artist and you have no other person producing you, you're a self-produced artist.

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eusti
Posts: 2108
Joined: 15 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

You realize that a lot of people on the forum are not native English speakers?

I'm not sure that a discussion about this helps anything.
The main thing is that Kenni, who is from Denmark, was trying (as an admin) to notify the forum members that this is the new format to be used in the "Reason Music" section... So, to focus on the perceived "mistake" of calling a musician / performer a producer is in my opinion quite besides the point.

D.

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Emerton
Posts: 117
Joined: 18 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

http://musicians.about.com/od/musiccare ... career.htm

Record Producers - What Do They Do?:

The record producer works with the band, sessions musicians and the studio engineer to "produce" the sound the recordings. Often the producer's job is to provide an extra set of ears, to produce a certain sound or to provide experience. They may be involved with arranging parts of the track or even writing it. In smaller studios the role of engineer and producers may be combined, and the band may producer or co-produce the recordings with the engineer.


In House Record Producers:

An in-house producer works in a particular studio, and his fees will usually be included in the cost of renting the studio, although they may also receive "points." Studios can often be keen to retain in demand producers as they can provide a major reasons for artists to come to the studio. Some producers, such as grunge pioneer Steve Albini in Chicago and lo-fi producer Kramer own their own studios. When booking a studio if you want to work with a particular in house producer, make sure that they are available and booked in for your session.


Independent Record Producers:

An independent producer will be employed by a band, or the label on the band's behalf, in order to gain a particular sound or in order to gain from the producer's reputation. The producer and the band will then go into a studio to record. The producer's fees will be separate from the studio rental fees. The producer will usually oversee the recording sessions as well as the mixing and the mastering of the recordings, but make sure this is made clear before the work starts, and that the overall fee is agreed.

How Do Record Producers Get Paid?:

Most producer will be paid a flat fee/advance for their work. Some will also receive points - a percentage of the dealer price of a record and/or a share of the profits made from the recordings. It's common for producers to receive both. A producer may work for a reduced up front fee in exchange for some points, or may secure a fee plus points, if they feel their production will be important to the record's success. Initially some producers may work for free to build up work but top producer can be very well paid. If you're involved in the songwriting process, you can expect royalties on top of your production fees.


Pioneering Record Producers:


Here are just a few producers credited with actually changing the way music sounds:

George Martin – the fifth Beatle. Working with The Beatles he invented many studio techniques still used today
Joe Meek – As well as pioneering numerous production tricks he was an electrical whiz who built some of the equipment he used.
Phil Spector – Used multiple musicians playing the same parts to create the “Wall of Sound” production style.
Robert Lange – Developed many multi track recording innovations, e.g. recording each string on Angus Young's (AC/DC) guitar on separate tracks for their seminal Back in Black album.

Hip Hop Record Producers:

The rise of hip hop saw the rise of the producer as star, with producers having a higher profile, and higher fees, than many of the artists they produce. Superstar hip hop producers can virtually guarantee a song will be hit, although the flipside is that they often pass in and out of style quickly, meaning the wrong producer at the wrong time can break a record as well.


Bedroom Record Producers:


The availability of computers has seen a rise in home studios, and bedroom producers. One of the most successful is Brian Burton. He began working on tracks in his bedroom under the name Danger Mouse, raising to prominence with The Gray Album, a mash up of Jay Z's Black Album and The Beatles' White Album. As well as bringing him to the attention of EMI's lawyers he caught Damon Albarn's ear, who brought him in to producer the second album by his virtual band Gorillaz, which earned Burton a Grammy. Next up was the worldwide smash hit Crazy, as Gnarls Barkley, and he's now one of the world's most sought after producers.


How Do I Become a Producer?:

Traditionally producers begin work as engineers in studios, or sometime as session musicians, gained experience in the studio environment. Then they begin working as an in-house producer until they gain a reputation. As Danger Mouse's story shows these days a producer can start working from their bedroom, however studio experience is very valuable to a producer. As a producer you'll probably be working with a studio engineer, but you'll be expected to know your way round a mixing desk. Working at your production skills in the bedroom is a good way to start, and try and gain work experience at a local recording studio.


Record Producer Contracts:

As with all aspects of the music industry, contracts are important, not least because they let everyone knows where they stand and what is expected of them. An engineer may feel that they're 'producing' the session - the band may not. A band may expect the producer to oversee recording, mixing and mastering but the producer may be only be expecting to work on the recordings. These issues, along with fees and point are more easily discussed before recording begins, and a contract can clear up any misunderstandings.

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Emerton
Posts: 117
Joined: 18 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

eusti wrote:You realize that a lot of people on the forum are not native English speakers?
So what? If you're speaking the language, accept correction when you're using a word incorrectly.
Would you accept some American who walks into France redefining French words because he doesn't know better?
Of course not.
I'm not sure that a discussion about this helps anything.
The main thing is that Kenni, who is from Denmark, was trying (as an admin) to notify the forum members that this is the new format to be used in the "Reason Music" section... So, to focus on the perceived "mistake" of calling a musician / performer a producer is in my opinion quite besides the point.

D.
Yeah well that's one less person who uses the word incorrectly (and there are a lot of kids with Reason who do).
That's how you change the world: one person at a time.

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motuscott
Posts: 1184
Joined: 16 Jan 2015
Location: the new york

Post 10 Jul 2015

Kill me now.
Sometimes a cigar is just a synth that's on fire

hydlide

Post 10 Jul 2015

I think the original poster already altered his post. I think there is no need to turn this in to an English class ;)

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Emerton
Posts: 117
Joined: 18 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

hydlide wrote:I think the original poster already altered his post. I think there is no need to turn this in to an English class ;)
Thanks for the class in netiquette. ;)
However, I was replying to Eusti challenging my initially simple reply.

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Kenni
Site Admin
Posts: 1191
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Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

Post 10 Jul 2015

Emerton wrote: Yeah well that's one less person who uses the word incorrectly (and there are a lot of kids with Reason who do).
That's how you change the world: one person at a time.
Your lack of clarification could lead one to think that you refer to me as a kid with Reason.

Pardon my missing English skills - People seldom misunderstand me though.
Emerton wrote:So what? If you're speaking the language, accept correction when you're using a word incorrectly.
We could do it in Danish instead? You do realise that 50% of the board users doesn't have english as their native tongue, right? Never the less, English is required in an international sense. It just so happens that English-speaking countries are terrible at other languages than English, that's why we do it. In a sense, it's everybody but the native English speaking users that tie places like this together on a global scale.

I didn't try to redefine the word producer. I used it as I would use it in Danish, and I'm pretty sure everybody understood what I ment.

Tone down the arrogance, "dude" - Being eloquent doesn't really change the fact that you're acting like a jerk.

On-topic, please.
Kenni Andruszkow
SoundCloud

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eusti
Posts: 2108
Joined: 15 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

Thank you hydlide, motuscott and Kenni. I wish I could like your posts! ;)

By the way: The friend / foe thing works nicely!

D.

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Emerton
Posts: 117
Joined: 18 Jan 2015

Post 10 Jul 2015

Kenni wrote:
Emerton wrote: Yeah well that's one less person who uses the word incorrectly (and there are a lot of kids with Reason who do).
That's how you change the world: one person at a time.
Your lack of clarification could lead one to think that you refer to me as a kid with Reason.
But you're not a kid are you? So why would you think I was including you?
If I said "lots of women with Reason do" would you think I meant you?
Pardon my missing English skills - People seldom misunderstand me though.
I see people misunderstanding each other all the time. Native speakers. Spouses. Friends. Misunderstandings are a part of life. Again, no insult in having a misunderstanding cleared up.
Emerton wrote:So what? If you're speaking the language, accept correction when you're using a word incorrectly.
We could do it in Danish instead? You do realise that 50% of the board users doesn't have english as their native tongue, right? Never the less, English is required in an international sense. It just so happens that English-speaking countries are terrible at other languages than English, that's why we do it. In a sense, it's everybody but the native English speaking users that tie places like this together on a global scale.
Any culture that has enormous amounts of native speakers is less multilingual than a smaller one. No need to insult English speakers' ability at bilingualism - given that English is an hybrid amalgam of French & German anyway.
The point remains that if you're attempting to speak a second language you shouldn't get offended if you're corrected on a mistake and leap to Eusti-like defences of them.
Tone down the arrogance, "dude" - Being eloquent doesn't really change the fact that you're acting like a jerk.
Name-calling now are we? ;) Aren't you a moderator?
I know I'm a jerk. An grumpy old-school crotchety jerk. No surprises there.

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Kenni
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Joined: 02 Jun 2015
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

Post 10 Jul 2015

Being offensive is not only about the choice of words, but also the perceived intentions. The sender decides on the message. In the real world, you get far by living by that notion.

Topic locked.
Kenni Andruszkow
SoundCloud

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