Amen breaks!

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Pinkbox
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Post 30 Apr 2015

submonsterz wrote:think we need to take all whats been posted in files and make a mash up mix each then mash em all together as one big mash up mix :) .
we need more filees!! :)

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freeQlow
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Location: East Coast

Post 03 May 2015

Jesus Breaks? 

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Dave909
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Joined: 04 May 2015

Post 13 May 2015

I would say it might be an "inside" thing. This loop is really old and it stood thruout time in the beatmaker community. I know dozens of songs its been used in. Hiphop, house, dnb, techno, etc. I guess if you haven't been active in beatmaking/sampling before samples became what they are today, cheap, then you will probably not appreciate it either. It's an oldschool thing :)

I do like the fact money was raised to express the appreciation for what the initial sampler did. He did start a piece of recycling history and he never made a buck on it.

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FGL
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Post 17 May 2015

Most of old popular Samples are only Prominent because there is some Solo. A Voice or Instrument. Before the Internet was fast like today it was not that easy to find something you could use. So much good Samples are used in multiple Songs this Days. And it seems the Amenbreak was the most usefull Sample ever.

KEVMOVE02
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Post 26 May 2015

Interesting thread! some of the comments prompted me to dig into my library and pull out The Dance Music Manual byRrick Snoman (if you've never heard of it, you better ask somebody or better yet, just buy it-- see link below). He provides an excellent history of the "6 secs that changed the music world", as well as a warning of what will happen to music if copyright laws limit access to prerecorded music as a source for musical innovation. His thoughts are prescient, considering the recent court judgement against Pharrell and Robin Thicke.

When the use of copyrighted music is used properly (original artist(s) acknowledged and compensated) it absolutely opens the door to musical soundscapes that would be impossible to synthesize any other way. However, when its abused, all we get is derivative and shallow copycat pop that leaves the consumer with a headache and a bad aftertaste. From my perspective, as long as The Winstons, James Brown and others get credit for being the foundation on which Hip Hop was built, then its all good! As a side note, you can't really claim to be a student of the genre if you don't know the breaks.
  • Who know about Cerrone? 
  • Who didn't try to learn Grandmaster Flash mastermix from Live Convention 81: #1 Cut Creators?
  • Saw WildStyle, Beatstreet and Krushgroove IN THE THEATER?
  • Who know the lyrics to  Radiance by Micstro?
  • Know about 7th Wonder's two most sampled songs?





http://www.amazon.com/Dance-Music-Manua ... sic+manual)


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FGL
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Post 26 May 2015

This Guy knows about Cerrone




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selig
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Post 26 May 2015

KEVMOVE02 wrote:Interesting thread! some of the comments prompted me to dig into my library and pull out The Dance Music Manual byRrick Snoman (if you've never heard of it, you better ask somebody or better yet, just buy it-- see link below). He provides an excellent history of the "6 secs that changed the music world", as well as a warning of what will happen to music if copyright laws limit access to prerecorded music as a source for musical innovation. His thoughts are prescient, considering the recent court judgement against Pharrell and Robin Thicke.
These cases are not at all related, as Pharrell etc did NOT use any pre-recorded music whatsoever!!! 

Confusing these cases and drawing conclusions from that confusion is not a good idea if your intent is to promote the proper use of copyrighted music IMO (as it appears to be below). :)
KEVMOVE02 wrote:When the use of copyrighted music is used properly (original artist(s) acknowledged and compensated) it absolutely opens the door to musical soundscapes that would be impossible to synthesize any other way. However, when its abused, all we get is derivative and shallow copycat pop that leaves the consumer with a headache and a bad aftertaste. From my perspective, as long as The Winstons, James Brown and others get credit for being the foundation on which Hip Hop was built, then its all good! As a side note, you can't really claim to be a student of the genre if you don't know the breaks.
  • Who know about Cerrone? 
  • Who didn't try to learn Grandmaster Flash mastermix from Live Convention 81: #1 Cut Creators?
  • Saw WildStyle, Beatstreet and Krushgroove IN THE THEATER?
  • Who know the lyrics to  Radiance by Micstro?
  • Know about 7th Wonder's two most sampled songs?





http://www.amazon.com/Dance-Music-Manua ... sic+manual)
Selig Audio, LLC

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FGL
Posts: 329
Joined: 23 Jan 2015

Post 26 May 2015

If I see what you can get for free this Days, sampeling of Copyrighted material is not needed. The very new Discover Service from PH has more Material then some huge CD Collection.

KEVMOVE02
Posts: 266
Joined: 26 Jan 2015

Post 26 May 2015

Selig, let me restate my thoughts:
  1. I think Rick Snoman does a good job (in his book) of tracing the history and impact of the use of the Amen Break, as related to the development of new musical genres.
  2. I think he makes a very strong case for the danger of music companies being inflexible in working with artists who sample copyrighted music. His prediction becomes almost prophetic, when you consider the ruling on the copyright infringement complaint against Pharrell and Robin Thicke for infringing Marvin Gaye's "Got To Give It Up" Depending on what happens on appeal, this could be a landmark case which allows a copyright holder to sue not just for unauthorized sampling (as in the case with Sam Smith), but copying the "feel" of a song. Quest-Love of The Roots briefly posted a "farewell to hip hop" on his Twitter account, believing that if you can be sued for "sounding like" another song (regardless of chord progression or instrument choice), hip hop doesn't have much hope, considering its foundation.
  3. The second part of my post was in response to comments related to "old school knowledge of hip hop". While the Amen Break is very recognizable, there are many other breakbeats that have found their way into the fabric of a lot of popular music, as well as being the core of several musical off shoots of hip hop.
  4. If you were able to discern my position on sampling from my previous comments, that is remarkable, considering that thought was not in my head while I was converting thoughts to words. In fact, I am in favor of "sampling" in its broadest sense; no person learns or creates music in a vacuum, so all musical expression will contain remnants of those who came before us. We take inspiration from where we find it. Isn't Reason designed to be the grandest homage to the best music creation tools known to man? 

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selig
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Location: The NorthWoods, CT, USA

Post 26 May 2015

KEVMOVE02 wrote:Selig, let me restate my thoughts:
  1. I think Rick Snoman does a good job (in his book) of tracing the history and impact of the use of the Amen Break, as related to the development of new musical genres.
  2. I think he makes a very strong case for the danger of music companies being inflexible in working with artists who sample copyrighted music. His prediction becomes almost prophetic, when you consider the ruling on the copyright infringement complaint against Pharrell and Robin Thicke for infringing Marvin Gaye's "Got To Give It Up" Depending on what happens on appeal, this could be a landmark case which allows a copyright holder to sue not just for unauthorized sampling (as in the case with Sam Smith), but copying the "feel" of a song. Quest-Love of The Roots briefly posted a "farewell to hip hop" on his Twitter account, believing that if you can be sued for "sounding like" another song (regardless of chord progression or instrument choice), hip hop doesn't have much hope, considering its foundation.
  3. The second part of my post was in response to comments related to "old school knowledge of hip hop". While the Amen Break is very recognizable, there are many other breakbeats that have found their way into the fabric of a lot of popular music, as well as being the core of several musical off shoots of hip hop.
  4. If you were able to discern my position on sampling from my previous comments, that is remarkable, considering that thought was not in my head while I was converting thoughts to words. In fact, I am in favor of "sampling" in its broadest sense; no person learns or creates music in a vacuum, so all musical expression will contain remnants of those who came before us. We take inspiration from where we find it. Isn't Reason designed to be the grandest homage to the best music creation tools known to man? 
I'm only commenting on things like you say in #2 above, as there was no "unauthorized sampling" in the Sam Smith case. Again I will suggest you are comparing apples to oranges.

My only point: the cases you present as evidence to support your point of view have nothing to do with your point of view. I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with your point, only suggesting that cases involving sampling would be better to use as cases to support sampling - that's all!

To reiterate, the cases you are quoting to suggest impending 'danger' for the future of artists who sample copyrighted music have absolutely NOTHING to do with sampling copyrighted music! That is all.
:)
Selig Audio, LLC

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