Something Like Fruity Fast Distortion

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selig
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Post 01 Oct 2019

Loque wrote:
01 Oct 2019
chaosroyale wrote:
01 Oct 2019
OP did specifically say they were trying to recreate that fruity plugin which uses a wet/dry knob. I hear you about the parallel channel, although I generally prefer to use just a wet/dry and boost the input to keep up the dry gain, anything to avoid adding yet more channels to an always-overloaded mixer!

Boosting the input on a distortion unit does not only increase the dry (if wet/dry is available), but it also has a huge impact on the resulting wet signal.
Boosting the input on a distortion should not affect the dry, but it IS the main control for the distortion drive. So when you boost the input, you change the tone AND increase the wet level (but should not affect the dry).

All to say, guitar amps/distortions have two main knobs for a reason: input (drive) and output (master). The input sets the tone, or amount of distortion, and the output sets the level. These are also present on compressors such as the 1176. You can also say threshold is similar to input (but only adjusts the input to the detector) while output functions like makeup gain.

You need both controls IMO - but these only affect the wet signal. Again, the problem I have with a dry/wet control is that is LOWERS the dry signal in addition to increasing the wet. I prefer to leave the dry signal unaffected so it doesn't change my mix too much, but totally understand others prefer a dry/wet control.
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Sterioevo
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Post 01 Oct 2019

I have been playing around with using the free Morfin Groovy Melon XF with some excellent results.
It is not a magic wand but definitely provides improved control of wet/dry and not just for distortion.

Process is as follows:
Patch source audio to a splitter.
Create a Groovy Melon XF
Patch 1 split to the I input of the Groovy Melon and set the Crossfader to 100% A. The Groovy Melon provides a constant power cross fade option.
Patch 2 split to the desired effect (100% wet) and then to the II input on the Groovy Melon.
Patch 3 to a M Class compressor to get a CV amplitude follower from your source material and then connect the CV Fader Input on the rear of the Groovy Melon XF.

The CV amplitude follower will control how much of the wet signal (B on the Crossfader) is mixed in with the dry signal. Then it is a case of tuning in by ear a good balance of levels, and settings on the CV follower and the effect device.

Melon is a fruit right?

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Loque
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Post 01 Oct 2019

Sterioevo wrote:
01 Oct 2019
I have been playing around with using the free Morfin Groovy Melon XF with some excellent results.
It is not a magic wand but definitely provides improved control of wet/dry and not just for distortion.

Process is as follows:
Patch source audio to a splitter.
Create a Groovy Melon XF
Patch 1 split to the I input of the Groovy Melon and set the Crossfader to 100% A. The Groovy Melon provides a constant power cross fade option.
Patch 2 split to the desired effect (100% wet) and then to the II input on the Groovy Melon.
Patch 3 to a M Class compressor to get a CV amplitude follower from your source material and then connect the CV Fader Input on the rear of the Groovy Melon XF.

The CV amplitude follower will control how much of the wet signal (B on the Crossfader) is mixed in with the dry signal. Then it is a case of tuning in by ear a good balance of levels, and settings on the CV follower and the effect device.

Melon is a fruit right?
Well done! For the ultimate mega patching you can create a look ahead by adding a full wet simple delay ith no feedback to both mixed audio signals with just a few msecs. This fixes the delay of the compressor gain reduction CV signal. But also may introduce a general audio delay (maybe PDC can catch it, try manual PDC...)
:reason: 11, Win10 64Bit.

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Stygian Abyss
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Post 02 Oct 2019

Loque wrote:
01 Oct 2019
Well done! For the ultimate mega patching you can create a look ahead by adding a full wet simple delay with no feedback to both mixed audio signals with just a few msecs. This fixes the delay of the compressor gain reduction CV signal. But also may introduce a general audio delay (maybe PDC can catch it, try manual PDC...)
Free RE VMG-01 Sample Delay seems to be a nice tool to apply this excellent advise. Delay of a few ms won't be an issue, at least for slow attack sounds, but it has to be the same for both wet an dry mixed signals or phase cancellation will happen.

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aeox
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Post 02 Oct 2019

Loque wrote:
29 Sep 2019
Mike B wrote:
29 Sep 2019
...
Ahhh..."Threshold"... This could be a dynamic Distortion... This can be build in Reason too. Maybe tomorrow i can provide a patch.

You could also try to add filters, EQ and Loudness to control the result of the distortion. Try this on a parallel channel to be able to mix it in. Also try "Invert Phase" on the SSL mixer channel.

Happy playing...

The saturation unit in Scenic :D
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ortxedys
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Post 03 Oct 2019

Boombastix wrote:
29 Sep 2019
Also, try Scream, set to Tape, and P2 set all they way to the left (zero).
I second this. Just as you mentioned that fruity distortion has critical acclaim within that community. I would say this is the equivalent of it. I mean, from what i gathered, you're looking for a saturation distortion. This is MY PERSONAL favorite and goes on every drum bus. It just makes your kicks and basses thump unlike anything else in reason. Atleast from my trial erroring.

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Creativemind
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Post 03 Oct 2019

Mike B wrote:
28 Sep 2019
Hey guys first post here. I purchased R11 yesterday and I am a complete newcomer to Reason Studios. Any feedback and help is much appreciated.

I am a full-time FL Studio user. It has a plugin called Fruity Fast Distortion. It's a type of distortion that hasn't much description besides that it is meant for bass and kick, but has been praised by many reddit users (can't find the reddit link anymore unfortunately) saying it is better than Izotope Trash and other Waveshapers.

This is what it looks like and its little description: https://www.image-line.com/support/flst ... 20Dist.htm

Is there something similar among the stock plugins or Rack Extensions ? Or can this be done with some cable routing ? In the Reason Rack Extension Shop, I found this "Forgotten Waveshaper": https://www.reasonstudios.com/shop/rack ... ve-shaper/

Has anyone tried it?

Thank you again for any feedback on how I can replicate this effect (more or less) inside of Reason.

Cheers!

Mike
Is it a hardstyle kick you're making?
:reason:

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Creativemind
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Post 03 Oct 2019

chaosroyale wrote:
29 Sep 2019
+1 for Saturation knob! Try the "keep low" setting for fat and subtle saturation on your low end.
To distort the low end, you want it on Keep High (I made that mistake for ages.) I always remember to put "the" in the middle. Keep the highs, keep the lows.
:reason:

Propellerhead Reason 10.4 / Cockus Reaper 5.982 / Cakewalk By Bandlab / Pro Tools First / Steinberg Cubase LE 5
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chaosroyale
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Post 07 Oct 2019

Sorry, I didn't explain myself clearly enough -

For sounds like kicks one usually wants a fat and heavy sound, which means NOT distorting the low end too much (*edit - in the case of Saturation knob and similar effects, but see below), because that will suck energy out of the thump and boom. The "keep low" mode on Saturation knob preferentially saturates the mids and highs, while keeping the low intact, which gives you a subtle but fat effect on low-end sounds like kicks and bass synths.

*EDIT: As usual Selig's reply below is right on the money and explained much more clearly, too. You can certainly fatten the bottom end with certain types of distortion/saturation, especially soft clipping types and judicious use of parallel. In fact, the Mr. Overdrive I recommended is something I use for this all the time. In the specific case of Saturation knob, the "keep high" mode has an effect on the low more like a foldback distortion (I haven't looked at the waveform to see if that is actually what it is) and this is why I was recommending the keep low mode.
Creativemind wrote:
03 Oct 2019
chaosroyale wrote:
29 Sep 2019
+1 for Saturation knob! Try the "keep low" setting for fat and subtle saturation on your low end.
To distort the low end, you want it on Keep High (I made that mistake for ages.) I always remember to put "the" in the middle. Keep the highs, keep the lows.
Last edited by chaosroyale on 07 Oct 2019, edited 1 time in total.

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selig
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Post 07 Oct 2019

chaosroyale wrote:
07 Oct 2019
Sorry, I didn't explain myself clearly enough -

For sounds like kicks one usually wants a fat and heavy sound, which means NOT distorting the low end too much, because that will suck energy out of the thump and boom. The "keep low" mode on Saturation knob preferentially saturates the mids and highs, while keeping the low intact, which gives you a subtle but fat effect on low-end sounds like kicks and bass synths.
I've been using ColoringEQ to take the opposite approach, which I much prefer - that is, to saturate ONLY the lows, specifically one frequency, and to keep the drive set to not add high frequency distortion (and filter it if added).

Why? Because saturation is more than just "distortion" - it's two things: additional harmonics, dynamic range compression. By saturation just the lows, you not only add some higher harmonics which add energy, you ALSO compress the lows which adds additional "weight" by adding more average/RMS energy down low. Because the saturation is added in parallel, you never loose any low end energy.

The results of this approach is very different to my ears than simply distorting the kick, or even distorting specific bands. It's easier to control and easier to make things "bigger" and most just sound "distorted" (Which you can also do if you like!).
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