Drag and replace samples(like kicks) in Sequencer

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Mohammadyarahmad
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Joined: 15 Jan 2023

Post 22 Jan 2023

Hello,
Is there a way to drag and replace a sample, like kick or clap, in Sequencer?
Or we should first delete the sample that is in the sequencer, then add the other sample? ( It's kind of annoying)

Salentino
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Joined: 07 Jan 2023

Post 22 Jan 2023

Don't expect too much out of Reason's sequencer, this is what you can do:

- play, stop, record, forward, backward
- loop
- write notes
- delete notes
- copy/paste
- zoom in/out
- change tempo
- turn metronome on/off

That's about it.

Oh. and quantize :lol:

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crimsonwarlock
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Post 22 Jan 2023

Reason has several drum samplers available. If you load your drum samples into Redrum or Kong and sequence those, replacing a drum sample is much less work than when you have the samples directly in the sequencer.
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Most users think the reason their requests aren't being met, is because some developer somewhere in a cubical refuses to waive its magic wand.

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jam-s
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Post 22 Jan 2023

You forgot some features:
- slice audio
- monophonic pitch correct
- transpose
- randomize notes
- explode into lanes
- clips + blocks
- comp audio takes
- add labels to clips
and a few more.

Baylo
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Post 22 Jan 2023

This, to me, is the biggest drawback with the idea that I frequently see these days of folks just dragging drum samples into the sequencer. Not saying it's not a valid workflow, and I recall Ryan even did a video on this several years ago, but it always seemed simpler to me to use one of the built in drum devices and midi notes to build up the track and easily audition different samples. You can always bounce a specific drum track to audio later if you need to do some audio editing in the sequencer.

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selig
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Post 23 Jan 2023

In other DAWs you can use this workflow a bit more effectively, I used to use it in Pro Tools frequently for example.
The reason it worked OK in Pro Tools (and other DAWs) was you could just replace the file in the audio folder and open the session file and all instances would be automatically replaced. Plus you could quantize audio clips and a few other features that made it a workable alternative. But the main reason I worked that way in PT was the lack of a decent sampler after my Sample Cell hardware was no longer compatible with my current computer. This was around the same time (early 2003) I got into Reason since I needed a sampler replacement and found I could get that AND a whole lot more with Reason!
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Popey
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Post 23 Jan 2023

crimsonwarlock wrote:
22 Jan 2023
Reason has several drum samplers available. If you load your drum samples into Redrum or Kong and sequence those, replacing a drum sample is much less work than when you have the samples directly in the sequencer.
+1 for this having it in drum sampler makes this much easier than individual samples in the time line.

I like to drag a load of the same samples into Kong or live's drum rack. This way you can then enter in your pattern (eg 4/4 kick pattern) and tab up through the keyboard auditioning different samples. I do this for every single perc instrument and find its a great way to chose elements quickly from a wide choice.

Mohammadyarahmad
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Joined: 15 Jan 2023

Post 26 Jan 2023

Thank you all guys
So, it's better to load drum in a Kong or Redrum.

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jam-s
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Post 26 Jan 2023

... or into NNXT, Mimic, or one of the other devices that can load samples.

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crimsonwarlock
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Post 27 Jan 2023

Mohammadyarahmad wrote:
26 Jan 2023
So, it's better to load drum in a Kong or Redrum.
One big benefit of working with a (drum) sampler is that you can sequence your drum patterns with sounds that kinda works, and then try out different samples for each drum and hear the result in context of your drum pattern (or the whole track for that matter). This gives a much better idea of a sample working or not, than when you only audition one-shots in the browser.
----
Most users think the reason their requests aren't being met, is because some developer somewhere in a cubical refuses to waive its magic wand.

AnotherMathias
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Post 27 Jan 2023

And TONS of other benefits, like velocity, tuning, envelopes, filters…
The drum sample directly in the arrangement workflow always baffles me.

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crimsonwarlock
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Post 27 Jan 2023

AnotherMathias wrote:
27 Jan 2023
The drum sample directly in the arrangement workflow always baffles me.
It seems to be an FL Studio thing, I constantly see it in FL Studio tutorials and live streams. Because some somewhat famous producers work that way in FL Studio (as they probably never used a real drum machine), everyone is copying that workflow. And FL Studio does have a drum sampler, go figure… so much for following the pros :lol:
----
Most users think the reason their requests aren't being met, is because some developer somewhere in a cubical refuses to waive its magic wand.

RobC
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Post 27 Jan 2023

AnotherMathias wrote:
27 Jan 2023
And TONS of other benefits, like velocity, tuning, envelopes, filters…
The drum sample directly in the arrangement workflow always baffles me.
I never worked that way either, but there are situations, where it's very useful.

For example:

Reversing a sample. You can easily and perfectly align/time it in the sequencer. (TBH, I only subconsciously know what align means. xD Positioning perfectly on the grid? : ) )

Cutting/trimming a sample. Sometimes a cut can create a really useful click. You can trim the ends to perfection, and add just the right amount of fade.

Manually editing dynamics. Change the volume of any part of the sample. Maybe raise a bit of the beginning, and create a nice attack. Or if a drum is too modern (compressed into diarrhea), you can further cut it in half or so, and fade out the second half.

There you have it. Arguably, manual sample editing can even beat a sampler, when it comes to flexibility. And you can make all kinds of changes to any sample hit, you wish.

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Creativemind
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Post 27 Jan 2023

jam-s wrote:
22 Jan 2023
You forgot some features:
- slice audio
- monophonic pitch correct
- transpose
- randomize notes
- explode into lanes
- clips + blocks
- comp audio takes
- add labels to clips
and a few more.
when are we getting slice by song position pointer? lol! oh and track folders and time markers. There's also automation including 1 curve and auto-crossfading no-one's mentioned.
:reason:

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Creativemind
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Post 27 Jan 2023

crimsonwarlock wrote:
27 Jan 2023
AnotherMathias wrote:
27 Jan 2023
The drum sample directly in the arrangement workflow always baffles me.
It seems to be an FL Studio thing, I constantly see it in FL Studio tutorials and live streams. Because some somewhat famous producers work that way in FL Studio (as they probably never used a real drum machine), everyone is copying that workflow. And FL Studio does have a drum sampler, go figure… so much for following the pros :lol:
Nah seen Logic users and I think a guy I know works that way in Ableton.
:reason:

Reason Studio's 11.3 / Cockos Reaper 6.73 / Cakewalk By Bandlab / Orion 8.6
http://soundcloud.com/creativemind75/iv ... soul-mix-3

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crimsonwarlock
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Post 27 Jan 2023

Creativemind wrote:
27 Jan 2023
crimsonwarlock wrote:
27 Jan 2023


It seems to be an FL Studio thing, I constantly see it in FL Studio tutorials and live streams. Because some somewhat famous producers work that way in FL Studio (as they probably never used a real drum machine), everyone is copying that workflow. And FL Studio does have a drum sampler, go figure… so much for following the pros :lol:
Nah seen Logic users and I think a guy I know works that way in Ableton.
I'll bet those are all FL Studio fugitives :lol:
----
Most users think the reason their requests aren't being met, is because some developer somewhere in a cubical refuses to waive its magic wand.

AnotherMathias
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Joined: 29 Sep 2020

Post 27 Jan 2023

At the risk of sounding dismissive, I bet it's a bit of a short attention span/instant gratification thing.

You see a sample, you see an arrangement view, so you drag one to the other, and soon you have a beat. No need to learn any devices/plugins. There's no interest in having it be a real-time playable instrument, either from a MIDI keyboard or even pads.

Personally I would find that to be such a joyless process!

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selig
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Post 27 Jan 2023

AnotherMathias wrote:
27 Jan 2023
At the risk of sounding dismissive, I bet it's a bit of a short attention span/instant gratification thing.

You see a sample, you see an arrangement view, so you drag one to the other, and soon you have a beat. No need to learn any devices/plugins. There's no interest in having it be a real-time playable instrument, either from a MIDI keyboard or even pads.

Personally I would find that to be such a joyless process!
I liked working this way in Pro Tools around 2000-2003, because at the time it gave me more quality and precision than I had trying to sync drum machines. Plus, I had tons of samples to work with since I had started with CMI and then S900 for drums from the start (never owned an actual ‘drum machine’!).
Folks looked at me pretty much the same way as you describe above, but as a drummer/programmer of many years at that point it was as much a way to deal with technical issues as a way to work differently for a while (until I got Reason!) and avoid falling into workflow ruts. That’s how MY brain works, fwiw…
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RobC
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Joined: 10 Mar 2018

Post 28 Jan 2023

The more possibilities and flexibilities I have, the better.

Sometimes, I created whole drum kits daily with Subtractor, then loaded them up in GoldWave (been using it since 23 years now!) and continued the sample editing. Of course, some tasks are more comfortable to do inside Reason's sequencer now.

Mohammadyarahmad
Posts: 7
Joined: 15 Jan 2023

Post 01 Feb 2023

RobC wrote:
27 Jan 2023
AnotherMathias wrote:
27 Jan 2023
And TONS of other benefits, like velocity, tuning, envelopes, filters…
The drum sample directly in the arrangement workflow always baffles me.
I never worked that way either, but there are situations, where it's very useful.

For example:

Reversing a sample. You can easily and perfectly align/time it in the sequencer. (TBH, I only subconsciously know what align means. xD Positioning perfectly on the grid? : ) )

Cutting/trimming a sample. Sometimes a cut can create a really useful click. You can trim the ends to perfection, and add just the right amount of fade.

Manually editing dynamics. Change the volume of any part of the sample. Maybe raise a bit of the beginning, and create a nice attack. Or if a drum is too modern (compressed into diarrhea), you can further cut it in half or so, and fade out the second half.

There you have it. Arguably, manual sample editing can even beat a sampler, when it comes to flexibility. And you can make all kinds of changes to any sample hit, you wish.
Like
This is what I really look for in my tracks.

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Quarmat
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Location: Europe

Post 01 Feb 2023

RobC wrote:
27 Jan 2023

(...) Arguably, manual sample editing can even beat a sampler, when it comes to flexibility. And you can make all kinds of changes to any sample hit, you wish.
This is how i usually do if I need to have variations of a one hit drum sample (eg. a kick).

1) Drag the sample in a audio track in the sequencer

2) create, on another track, a Kong, a ReDrum, a NN19, Mimic, whatever sample device with empty slots

3) load the unmodified drum sample in the sampler's (eg. Kong) empty slot 1

4) edit the sample in the sequencer then bounce it in a single clip and load into slot 2

5) repeat for other variation of the same sample and load them in the subsequent slots 3, 4, 5 etc.

6) use the midi to recall the samples from the (e.g.) Kong into the sequencer.

Best of both worlds!

RobC
Posts: 1590
Joined: 10 Mar 2018

Post 02 Feb 2023

Quarmat wrote:
01 Feb 2023
RobC wrote:
27 Jan 2023

(...) Arguably, manual sample editing can even beat a sampler, when it comes to flexibility. And you can make all kinds of changes to any sample hit, you wish.
This is how i usually do if I need to have variations of a one hit drum sample (eg. a kick).

1) Drag the sample in a audio track in the sequencer

2) create, on another track, a Kong, a ReDrum, a NN19, Mimic, whatever sample device with empty slots

3) load the unmodified drum sample in the sampler's (eg. Kong) empty slot 1

4) edit the sample in the sequencer then bounce it in a single clip and load into slot 2

5) repeat for other variation of the same sample and load them in the subsequent slots 3, 4, 5 etc.

6) use the midi to recall the samples from the (e.g.) Kong into the sequencer.

Best of both worlds!
Yeah, going back and forth both methods is an even better way when it comes to doing things that aren't possible in the sequencer.

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