Microphone for vocals - advice needed

Want to talk about music hardware or software that doesn't include Reason?
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EnochLight
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Joined: 17 Jan 2015

Post 16 Jun 2017

The_G wrote:
EnochLight wrote:
The_G wrote:Now the real work begins...singing with confidence haha
Heheh - go forth and sing! ;)

Slightly related: what are you using for vocal de-essing? For the record, I strongly suggest Selig's DeEsser Rack Extension if you want to stay ITB with Reason. Even with VST available, Selig's DeEsser is probably one of the best de-essers on the market. It's quick and effective, yet extremely simple.
I use Tone Boosters Sibilance, but I do have Selig DeEsser, so I'll try that as well.
I've got Tone Boosters Sibilance as well. I'd rate Selig's DeEsser at least as good, but a lot simpler to use, IMHO. That said, if you prefer a fancy GUI/UX and display, Tone Boosters Sibilance wins (sorry Selig)! ;).
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selig
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Post 16 Jun 2017

EnochLight wrote:
The_G wrote:
EnochLight wrote:
The_G wrote:Now the real work begins...singing with confidence haha
Heheh - go forth and sing! ;)

Slightly related: what are you using for vocal de-essing? For the record, I strongly suggest Selig's DeEsser Rack Extension if you want to stay ITB with Reason. Even with VST available, Selig's DeEsser is probably one of the best de-essers on the market. It's quick and effective, yet extremely simple.
I use Tone Boosters Sibilance, but I do have Selig DeEsser, so I'll try that as well.
I've got Tone Boosters Sibilance as well. I'd rate Selig's DeEsser at least as good, but a lot simpler to use, IMHO. That said, if you prefer a fancy GUI/UX and display, Tone Boosters Sibilance wins (sorry Selig)! ;).
I agree - Selig DeEsser was designed to "just work" without having to touch a single knob in most cases, but there are many options out there for those who love to go down the "rabbit hole"!
:)
Selig Audio, LLC

Daria91
Posts: 2
Joined: 20 Nov 2018

Post 20 Nov 2018

Recommend Rode NT1-A - is a low-noise, studio, condenser, professional microphone, which has only 4dB of its own noise. This sample is a modernized and improved version of the classic microphone NT-1 from the Rode brand. The NT1-A has a warm sound, high clarity, ability to perceive high dynamic range and extended dynamic range.
https://microphonetopgear.com/microphon ... op-vocals/
All the characteristics of this model indicate that NT1-A is what you require to have for high-quality vocal recording.

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cognitive
Posts: 108
Joined: 25 Apr 2018
Location: Los Angeles

Post 27 Nov 2018

For live, I'll use a dynamic mic like a Shure Beta 58 or a Super 55 (which has a Beta 58 like capsule).

For studio vocals, I usually grab a large diaphragm condenser mic, a Shure KSM32 being my basic go-to, or other condenser mics for different voices. Sometimes I break out the Shure SM7B for certain voice types. Hey, if it was good enough for Michael Jackson ...

For spoken voice intended for broadcast, I almost always go with the SM7B.

All that being said, you can certainly get great sounding recordings with something like a 57/58. Most of John Lennon's vocals were done with a 57. Legendary producer Andy Johns often used a 58 to record vocals instead of pricier condenser mics. You know ... The Rolling Stones, Rod Stewart, etc... And a 58 was used to record a lot of Billy Idol's vocals. Now, add the additional quality and clarity of the beta line and you're really cooking. :)

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cognitive
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Location: Los Angeles

Post 27 Nov 2018

Sorry, that last post reads like an ad for Shure. :o

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WeLoveYouToo
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Joined: 01 Jul 2017
Location: portland, or

Post 28 Nov 2018

buy a 57/58 at the store and return the one you like least. once you properly treat your recording space get a nt1 or similar. the condenser mic will pick up what your voice sounds like including the reflections of the room. the dynamic mics (57/58) will pick up just your voice, but you will probably want to add some verb and sparkle in post.
just remember the nicest condenser mic and micheal jackson in your studio singing for you will sound like a recording made in a room at the end of the day, whereas a 99$ 57 will pick up just the noise in fromt of it (your voice) and let you mix easier. it’s all about the mix, not the quality of mic.

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selig
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Post 01 Dec 2018

cognitive wrote:
All that being said, you can certainly get great sounding recordings with something like a 57/58. Most of John Lennon's vocals were done with a 57. Legendary producer Andy Johns often used a 58 to record vocals instead of pricier condenser mics. You know ... The Rolling Stones, Rod Stewart, etc... And a 58 was used to record a lot of Billy Idol's vocals. Now, add the additional quality and clarity of the beta line and you're really cooking. :)
Not at all sure “most” of John Lennon’s vocals were done on a 57 - certainly not most of his Beatles catalog. I’ve hear “Rock and Roll” was possibly done on a 57, but that’s only one album.

Things like this are notoriously difficult to be 100% certain about, as sometimes the rough/tracking vocals are done with one microphone (and folks on that session report that microphone), while the final vocal may be re-recorded (more than once) on different microphones. So even if you witnessed a vocal being recorded on one mic, it may have later been re-recorded on another.

I can say that many male vocals over the years have been recorded on the venerable SM7(b), often removing all of the built in wind screen/shielding and using a separate pop filter. Many live performers prefer a hand held microphone (such as a 57 or 58) for studio work, as they have learned to work the mic by hand (studio mics have to be worked by moving your head rather than your hand, a totally different technique some singers do not like!). Plus, they can move around the room more without getting “off mic”. In the end, it’s often better to get a superior performance over a superior “sound”…

FWIW, the wind screen of the 58 if often the only reason it is preferred to the 57, as there is little difference between the two otherwise.


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Mr. Watts
Posts: 113
Joined: 05 Sep 2017

Post 03 Dec 2018

I used to have an AT4040 and I really liked it a lot. Sold it years back due to life situations and have since gotten an AT2035. The sound is good for a low budget mic and I’m able to get a decent result with the right eq, comp, and reverb. With that said, I would much rather have the 4040 and am looking to upgrade as soon as financially possible. If you are able to buy a used 4040 in good condition I would go that route.

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eusti
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Joined: 15 Jan 2015

Post 03 Dec 2018

Not sure if someone has mentioned 3U's mics yet? https://www.gearslutz.com/board/low-end ... cings.html
I have one and am quite happy with it.

D.

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LABONERECORDINGS
Posts: 225
Joined: 16 Jan 2015
Location: UK

Post 05 Dec 2018

We've got Slate ML1 with VMS One a while ago, never looked back, some seriously cool emulations with that. And then we got the ML2 as well. Both condensers, work really well with the VMS One as well as other soundcards (we've used the ML2 with Focusrite to record a guitar amp directly so we have a bit of room as well as the speaker.... long session with double tracking dry guitar in > Reason audio channel > Guitar Rig and other effects, including Scream with it's tracking effect.. sick... and then the ML2 recording the amp back in to Reason (so both wet and dry signals for recomping new effect version from the raw signal in the first place.

But for vocals, holy sh*t.... yeah we had sE X1 and a Rode but damn.... condenser all the way here. VMS just nails it. 25 mics for the price of a limb / lung on black market but well worth respirating :D

Razgriz_101
Posts: 6
Joined: 11 Dec 2018

Post 13 Dec 2018

I'm using a Behringer C1 for vocals, it's good for amateur use, but if my friends and I are to try and come up with something serious (short movies, but with decent quality), can we keep going with this one or should we consider upgrading to something better? Thanks!

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