Perfect coffee beans and type

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RobC
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Post 17 Oct 2019

To give a re-cap:

Robusta = cheaper, because regulations allow more bad beans. There are quality ones, however. It's more bitter. Also, stronger.
Arabica = more expensive, better quality, usually, less bitter, more tasty, but also weaker.

Commonly, you get a mix of both, which isn't a bad thing, but I'm not a fan of bitterness, and don't like too much of a caffeine kick.

Espressos, which are shorter coffees, usually use a dark roast of either arabica, or a blend with robusta. They need to be ground finer. Obviously rely on pressure. Commonly, they have little to no acidity (yet I love that). I had different types, and they usually needed a lot of milk for me, so I don't spit it out (that's subjective of course - some people hate filter, and other equal american coffee to piss x D).

Italian style coffee with that thingy you heat on the stove. Yeah the moka... f... that. Not for me. That's dreadful.

Turkish coffee? Gonna have nightmares.

Probably has nothing to do with it, but coming from Germany, I was glad to find out that they prefer filter coffee. I do too! It's not too short, not too long, and is absolutely ~fabulous~ with cream and sugar! But, it takes quite long to prepare! >_> The beans need medium, rougher grinding. Ideally, they should be medium roast.

Can't wait to try french press one day!

Now to beans themselves!

Once I got myself a bit educated, I started buying coffee beans. I avoided brands such as Douwe Egberts, Jacobs, and even Tchibo - cause they may be over-advertised, and as a low-class person, they were cheap enough for me, but also near god-awful. There is worse of course, but no thanks to that, too. Their beans are mostly the cheapest, too.
The first one was by L'OR. Behold! I later realized, it's some crap tossed out by Douwe Egberts and Jacobs (I think?). Okay, not that crap, for a first timer, it had pretty good aroma, and I was fine with the taste. It WAS quite expensive compared to others, though! Plus like I imply, I didn't have freshly ground coffee at home, before. It had supposedly more acidity, was medium roast, a mix of robusta and arabica.
Then I got an even more expensive, probably mid-upper class coffee by Dallmayr. At first, it seemed to be less aromatic than L'OR, but it was more tasty. It still wasn't what I was looking for. Looking at its specifications, it had less acidity than L'OR maybe, so that's a bit of a bummer for me.
Yesterday I went for one by Lavazza. Unlike the previous ones, it was finally one that is 100% arabica! It is less strong, less bitter, maybe more acidy, and I love it! The aroma beats the shit out of the previous ones for me.
Now, I'm not saying that cheaper coffees couldn't be good. It's all subjective. Maybe I'm making a mistake that I don't give Jacobs and Tchibo a try (mind you, Tchibo has expensive ones, too, but they are mostly for espresso - what's available here, at least). But yeah, I'd need a taste test, or something, cause you know, these are available in 1 kg packs, and if I don't like it, it's a waste.
I'm also slightly interested in Segafredo's coffee beans ~ some say their coffees aren't as good as they used to be. I still may give them a try, but so far, Lavazza seems to be the winner for me. But that's probably cause it's 100% arabica, which is more close to my preference. I'd call it middle-class. There are really expensive ones, such as by Illy, which is said to be the holy grail. : ) But not for my pocket. Starbucks? Pricey, too but I heard bad things, but also good things, lol.
I gotta say, then again I find the one by Lavazza a very-very little watery, so maybe a hint of robusta isn't bad after all. Maybe I should try mixing Lavazza and Dallmayr, to see if I get a for me, perfect coffee.

All in all, I even so, doubt I'll get L'OR again, cause when compared to Dallmayr, it had worse aroma, and unpleasant bitterness for me.
Dallmayr is a bit too bitter; Lavazza is a tiny bit weak, but I love it so far.
I think Lavazza could push the acidity a bit more, but it's decent. Perhaps I should find something with light roast to see how acid that will be.

Again, before I get sued by companies, this is all subjective. You have to try and taste for yourself. It could and can very much be that what I love, is an ultimate shit for you. x D I added coffee beans to 'classes' by how affordable they are. What I'm looking at, and for, are mostly medium roast, filter coffee beans, that are more on the acid side with optimal aroma.

At the moment, chances are, Lavazza is the winner for me.
I make coffee with a combined, automatic grinder and filter coffee machine. It's fun to set it to 4 AM to do its thing, so that everyone gets up in a shock. x D

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MrFigg
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Post 17 Oct 2019

I just came out of an operation and am still pretty groggy men RT is my first port of call. Lavazza rocks. Soon I’m going home to drink a cup of Gevalia (swedish).
Have you ever tried that coffee where some sort of animal eats the beans and then craps them out before they make it into drinkable coffee? I got to taste it a year or two ago. It was pretty good but that may because it came together with a twenty something year old malt whisky and also because the guy told me it cost an extortionate amount of money :)
Right...now I’m too dizzy to write more. See yz later when I’m more awake :).
Edit: just checked and apparently that coffee was going for $500 (usd) per kilo in 2010. Man. You could get a lot more Illy for that sort of cash.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kopi_luwak

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stratatonic
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Post 17 Oct 2019

It's eight in the morning and you can barely keep your eyes open, much less engage in the activities that constitute productive participation in the glorious neoliberal machinery of our economy. At this point you could, as more than half of all American adults do on a daily basis, drink a cup of coffee to stave off the fog of imminent unconsciousness. After all, you love coffee. And not just because of the caffeine. But have you really thought it all through?

Sure, just the other day, you bought some incredible single-origin nanolot coffee beans, and that half-pound bag cost as much as two, maybe three avocado toasts. In fact, you bought enough to keep some at home and at work. It's a legit varietal, like Gesha or Bourbon, from a remarkable local roaster who operates quasi-legally out of a sick loft and specializes in light—but not too light!—roasts, a respectful homage to modern Scandinavian coffee that lets you really get a sense of the bean's terroir, down to the GPS coordinates where it was discovered during an expedition into coffee country led by a white man of great taste, and the barista said that the acidity from this coffee is "really wonderful and fruit-forward, like Hawaiian Punch micro-dosed with LSD."

When you bought it, you checked the roast date printed in the too-small font carefully—because after two weeks you might as well dump it all down the garbage disposal—and how it was processed, because you don't want any of those weird or off flavors you get sometimes with natural coffees, which would ruin everything. Anyway, the point is, the coffee beans are totally great. Right? Sure.

You still have to make the coffee, though. You're so tired you'd love it if a machine made it for you, but cheap automatics aren't good enough for your great coffee beans, and the good automatics aren't cheap enough for your budget. The Chemex's filter is so thick all you can taste is paper; the Aeropress doesn't make enough coffee to get you through the morning, though it'll do whenever you’re on the road or at a friend’s; the French press is for Europeans and charlatans who love sludge; and you're reasonable enough to never try to make espresso at home. Obviously, you're just going to have to make a pourover, which is fine and totally worth it anyway, you guess, because there's nothing quite like the feeling of crafting, with your personal human hands, a perfect cup of coffee. One. Cup. At. A. Time.

Of course, you might mess it all up, and if you do — as you totally know — you'll have at minimum rendered meaningless the life of a plant, the time and labor of a farmer, the care of a processor, the energy of an importer, the discernment of a coffee buyer, and the skill of a roaster. And there are so, so many ways to screw it up. If you grind the coffee too finely in your no-less-than-two-hundred-dollar burr grinder, or make the water too hot, or let it take too long to brew, it will be bitter, because you will have committed the sin of overextraction according to the gospel of the Brewing Control Chart, having dissolved more than twenty-two percent of the grounds' solubles into your cup. Disgraceful.
On the other hand, if your grind setting is too coarse, the water too tepid, or the brew time too short, it will taste sour and vegetal because you underextracted it, and didn't get even eighteen percent of the coffee solubles into your brew. What an idiot, either way. Still, don't be so hard on yourself: As long as the grind is perfectly dialed in, the water correctly heated to the precise temperature, and your drip technique as graceful and measured as the lines of the gooseneck kettle you're pouring water from, everything will turn out just fine.
“Anyway, the point is, the coffee beans are totally great. Right? Sure. ”

But if you're not up to doing it yourself — and who could blame you, you’re so exhausted — you could totally get coffee at that fancy shop near your office. You know, the one with the white brick walls, marble counters, and wood accents reclaimed from the wreck of a ship that had carried the very first coffee cargo from Indonesia to Europe after the Dutch colonization.
Sure, the barista who you see every time scowls at you, and he always asks if you want milk and sugar in your coffee, and it’s not because he's trying to be chill and accommodating to regular people who just want some coffee the way they've been drinking it their entire lives, but because one time a friend of yours gently asked if she could have some of the shop's flavored syrup in her iced coffee, thereby obligating the barista to explain that a cup of coffee is the singular and miraculous end product of a process that involved the labor of dozens of people stretched across an extraordinarily long supply chain that reaches halfway around the world, and it shouldn't really be covered up with sugar syrup, which is only on the menu for the rubes, anyway.

Then there was that time you tried to order the "seasonal guest espresso" prominently listed on the hand-written menu, just to prove that you’re on the barista’s level and that you deserve respect as a knowledgeable customer who tips well if not as a human being, but he just mumbled that it wasn’t dialed in and so he wouldn’t serve it, and you’ve been beaten down ever since. Facing down that disdain is worth it though, knowing that your coffee is going to be absolutely perfect, because that barista has never made a bad cup of coffee in his entire life.

But the lines are so long, and you're right, you don't have thirty minutes to waste looking at Instagram while you wait for that guy to dourly make your coffee. You need to be driving your Uber or cranking out #content or putting together pitch decks or writing code for a social network for shaved cat owners that will change the world. Maybe you could just buy one of those new ready-to-drink cold brews that come in little bottles or cans, like craft beer, or in little cartons, like craft ... milk? They're super convenient and they're made by the companies that made coffee good in the first place, so they're definitely filled with great coffee, even if they don't tell you exactly where it's from on the packaging and, like you read in that one article, all cold brew tastes the same because it doesn't really like taste like much of anything at all — cool water is a poor solvent, so it doesn't extract all those finicky flavors from the beans that let you really know where they came from, right?

On the bright side, that means you could get one of the cartons with the milk and sugar mixed right in, because there's no reason to feel guilty about covering up the coffee when you don't know where it comes from or exactly what it tastes like, and besides, it's finally starting to be cool to admit that milk and sugar taste really good in coffee. But you forgot: carbs. Also, you're not so sure why you're expected to pay just as much for one of those bottles or cartons filled with weeks-old coffee as you would for freshly brewed coffee in a fancy shop, or how you can afford to pay five dollars a cup for coffee twice a day, every day of the week.
Starbucks, then? Never. Even if it's getting nitro cold brew and the white mocha, which you've definitely never taken a sip of, though you often admit in a performatively sheepish way, is "pretty good."

Well, you haven't considered this in a long time, but maybe it would make sense to just get a cheap cup of coffee somewhere. At Dunkin Donuts, or Tim Horton's, or a deli. Or even the office pot. Not every cup of coffee needs to be life-changing, after all, and you just need to stay alert enough to seem engaged.

But then you start to think about what's in the paper cup, and your mind moves backward in flashback sequence with lots of fast cuts: the carafe of coffee growing rancid as it's kept warm by a hot plate hours for after being brewed, the grounds dumped indiscriminately into the brewer from a vacuum-sealed foil bag weeks or even months after being roasted at faraway production facility, and finally, on the undistinguished green coffee beans being picked by anonymous farmers paid well below subsistence-level wages for their labor and their crops, or at least way less than they would be paid for growing good coffee, because all that cheap coffee is definitely not fair trade, much less direct trade — there's not a single black-and-white photo of a coffee farmer on Dunkin's website, you’ve pointed out before — and in the end, you just can’t allow yourself to engage in such rampantly unethical consumption.

You know what? All you really need is the caffeine. A Diet Coke sounds great.
https://www.eater.com/2016/6/8/11883828 ... -starbucks

RobC
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Post 17 Oct 2019

MrFigg wrote:
17 Oct 2019
I just came out of an operation and am still pretty groggy men RT is my first port of call. Lavazza rocks. Soon I’m going home to drink a cup of Gevalia (swedish).
Have you ever tried that coffee where some sort of animal eats the beans and then craps them out before they make it into drinkable coffee? I got to taste it a year or two ago. It was pretty good but that may because it came together with a twenty something year old malt whisky and also because the guy told me it cost an extortionate amount of money :)
Right...now I’m too dizzy to write more. See yz later when I’m more awake :).
Edit: just checked and apparently that coffee was going for $500 (usd) per kilo in 2010. Man. You could get a lot more Illy for that sort of cash.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kopi_luwak
Gevalia does sound promising, too bad it seems I can't get it here. At least not easily.
Nonono xD I heard of that coffee, but I don't want to try anything like that. There were rumors about Camel cigarettes - though they turned out to be false. I was hesitant to ever try them, still.
Whoa, that's so expensive, not even the Dallmayr exclusive things beat that (I think).
Haven't tasted Illy yet. Though what's available here, is for Espressos. I just want my "half-piss" x D filter coffee.
Honestly, this is like some lame wunderground article I read once.
But yeah, just because an article writer gets ridiculously into... parodying (?) I guess, and trying to be cool by saying it's not cool; I won't stop enjoying a little coffee fun. ; )

RobC
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Post 18 Oct 2019

Okay, so today the Lavazza coffee was perfect. We now can add a rainbow above the pink ~fabulous~. That good.
I'll eventually try Illy once.

But for now, the winner for me is: Lavazza Qualitá Oro https://www.lavazza.com.au/en_AU/coffee ... a-oro.html
They suggest it for espresso, which is odd, cause it's medium roast, and as they say, not too fine, not too rough grinding recommended ~ and that is ideal for filter, actually.
Whatever, I find it awesome (for now ; ) )!

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MrFigg
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Post 18 Oct 2019

As long as it’s medium roast and it’s organic you’re fine man. That’s the two things you need it to be.

Sterioevo
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Post 18 Oct 2019

The other factor is the barista making the coffee and their machine. Can be the difference between a good and bad coffee.

reggie1979
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Post 18 Oct 2019

So, considering the care are thought put into much of this thread, my K Cups with Pete's coffee doesn't qualify? :lol:

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bxbrkrz
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Post 18 Oct 2019

Cafe La Llave Espresso :thumbs_up: (smooth for my taste)
Cafe Bustelo Espresso :thumbs_up: (bitter for my taste)
I like to switch them around.

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Reasonable man
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Post 19 Oct 2019

Have an addiction problem . It used to fuel my insomnia but now it actually prevents it. I believe i have come full circle.
They say that the human body is made up of 60 perent water...I'm made up of 70 percent coffee. Gots to have it . I don't even taste it anymore i just has to have it.

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selig
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Post 20 Oct 2019

Thanks to Holly, I'm now a coffee "home roaster". Talk about being a coffee geek - ordering single origin green coffee beans is the ONLY way to totally control your coffee quality, well, besides growing the beans yourself.
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guitfnky
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Post 20 Oct 2019

I’ve reverse-engineered how to accurately reproduce the iconic Tim Horton’s double-double at home, and I’m not sure what all this other discussion is necessary for. 😆

RobC
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Post 21 Oct 2019

MrFigg wrote:
18 Oct 2019
As long as it’s medium roast and it’s organic you’re fine man. That’s the two things you need it to be.
Medium roast - check!
Organic? - Err... Who knows (comes from 6 types)? x D
Sterioevo wrote:
18 Oct 2019
The other factor is the barista making the coffee and their machine. Can be the difference between a good and bad coffee.
It's varied for me, cause I make it myself. Sometimes better, other times not-bad ~ so that's pretty good all in all. : ) But I'm willing to put effort into it. Especially when I'll have more money.
reggie1979 wrote:
18 Oct 2019
So, considering the care are thought put into much of this thread, my K Cups with Pete's coffee doesn't qualify? :lol:
I overheard a conversation of two younger workers at the supermarket, refilling stocks. They discussed the capsule based coffees, and one said, don't try it.
What I think is, why couldn't they be enjoyable? Definitely better than a mocha, or turkish coffee IMO. Though I never had any ~ but I know those coffee vending machines; and previously I had some Nescafé freeze dried coffee. It's nice! But you can do better I think.
I had a shitty espresso machine - I think, nothing beats what that makes (and that's not meant positively).

In short, it's a step up from basic coffee!
bxbrkrz wrote:
18 Oct 2019
Cafe La Llave Espresso :thumbs_up: (smooth for my taste)
Cafe Bustelo Espresso :thumbs_up: (bitter for my taste)
I like to switch them around.
Okay, so maybe I shouldn't give up on espressos, just because my previous machine was bad. Any experience comparing with other coffee types (especially vs. filter)?
Reasonable man wrote:
19 Oct 2019
Have an addiction problem . It used to fuel my insomnia but now it actually prevents it. I believe i have come full circle.
They say that the human body is made up of 60 perent water...I'm made up of 70 percent coffee. Gots to have it . I don't even taste it anymore i just has to have it.
I used to have insomnia from the shitty coffee that my espresso machine made. Also weird upper back muscle cramps at night (I guess some nerves don't like caffeine). However, even a stronger kick from the recent good filter one lets me sleep. And I wake up in time.
selig wrote:
20 Oct 2019
Thanks to Holly, I'm now a coffee "home roaster". Talk about being a coffee geek - ordering single origin green coffee beans is the ONLY way to totally control your coffee quality, well, besides growing the beans yourself.
I might get some coffee from a coffee house, too! Did you find/try quality robusta?
As for home roasting, I can't imagine how good that must be! I guess there's a machine for that, too?
Doesn't matter how much time it takes to prepare, I gotta say, a really good cup of coffee can be one of the highlights of the day.

Yeah, the Lavazza coffee beans I got, are like 6-origin, so pretty much swept together. No wonder sometimes I like it more than other times.
Ha, I wish I could grow it here, but winter kills it.
Oh well, I can't complain, I grew tomatoes and made such luxurious quality puree, that now I can't eat what stores have to offer. Too bad that climate change reduced the harvest to a fraction, but hopefully it will last this year.
guitfnky wrote:
20 Oct 2019
I’ve reverse-engineered how to accurately reproduce the iconic Tim Horton’s double-double at home, and I’m not sure what all this other discussion is necessary for. 😆
Reverse-engineer a good cup of coffee now! : )

RobC
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Post 21 Oct 2019

Taking the coffee to the next level: brown sugar.

I only could get cane sugar, which is also just white sugar with stuff added to it afterwards. However, I think I might be able to get true brown sugar - the kind that is like wet sand (doesn't taste like it, though). That stuff is awesome. I had some once.

Of course, the simpler one that I got, adds a little extra to my coffee, too, but I want the real deal!

I also found some quality cream that I'm gonna try next. It's UHT, too, but I don't mind, cause I don't fancy the cow musk that's in 'true milk'. >_<

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MrFigg
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Post 21 Oct 2019

RobC wrote:
21 Oct 2019
Taking the coffee to the next level: brown sugar.

I only could get cane sugar, which is also just white sugar with stuff added to it afterwards. However, I think I might be able to get true brown sugar - the kind that is like wet sand (doesn't taste like it, though). That stuff is awesome. I had some once.

Of course, the simpler one that I got, adds a little extra to my coffee, too, but I want the real deal!

I also found some quality cream that I'm gonna try next. It's UHT, too, but I don't mind, cause I don't fancy the cow musk that's in 'true milk'. >_<
Don’t want to be a sugar nazi, and I do like sweet stuff, but sugar really is pure poison man.

RobC
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Post 21 Oct 2019

MrFigg wrote:
21 Oct 2019
RobC wrote:
21 Oct 2019
Taking the coffee to the next level: brown sugar.

I only could get cane sugar, which is also just white sugar with stuff added to it afterwards. However, I think I might be able to get true brown sugar - the kind that is like wet sand (doesn't taste like it, though). That stuff is awesome. I had some once.

Of course, the simpler one that I got, adds a little extra to my coffee, too, but I want the real deal!

I also found some quality cream that I'm gonna try next. It's UHT, too, but I don't mind, cause I don't fancy the cow musk that's in 'true milk'. >_<
Don’t want to be a sugar nazi, and I do like sweet stuff, but sugar really is pure poison man.
It is. Most of the time it makes me feel like washed crap. At least I had a good time! x D

I use artificial sweetener for lemonade though - and even prefer that over sugar for it. But in coffee, it really doesn't work for me.

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guitfnky
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Post 21 Oct 2019

RobC wrote:
21 Oct 2019
guitfnky wrote:
20 Oct 2019
I’ve reverse-engineered how to accurately reproduce the iconic Tim Horton’s double-double at home, and I’m not sure what all this other discussion is necessary for. 😆
Reverse-engineer a good cup of coffee now! : )
why would I want a good cup of coffee--or why over-engineer a good cup--when I've already figured out how to make a great one? :?

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MrFigg
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Post 21 Oct 2019

I used to take two spoons in a cup of coffee. Then I cut it down to one and then to zero. I can’t imagine drinking coffee with sugar now. Maybe worth an experiment?

RobC
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Post 21 Oct 2019

guitfnky wrote:
21 Oct 2019
RobC wrote:
21 Oct 2019



Reverse-engineer a good cup of coffee now! : )
why would I want a good cup of coffee--or why over-engineer a good cup--when I've already figured out how to make a great one? :?
Oh! At first I thought it was some synth patch what you mentioned in your first comment. Then I quickly googled, and found some hamburger thing. x D Only now I see it was coffee! : P
MrFigg wrote:
21 Oct 2019
I used to take two spoons in a cup of coffee. Then I cut it down to one and then to zero. I can’t imagine drinking coffee with sugar now. Maybe worth an experiment?
I experimented before, but in such case I rather don't drink coffee at all, cause I can't drink it without sugar. Or at least I won't enjoy it.

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guitfnky
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Post 21 Oct 2019

RobC wrote:
21 Oct 2019
guitfnky wrote:
21 Oct 2019


why would I want a good cup of coffee--or why over-engineer a good cup--when I've already figured out how to make a great one? :?
Oh! At first I thought it was some synth patch what you mentioned in your first comment. Then I quickly googled, and found some hamburger thing. x D Only now I see it was coffee! : P
🤔 WAT?

RobC
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Post 21 Oct 2019

guitfnky wrote:
21 Oct 2019
RobC wrote:
21 Oct 2019

Oh! At first I thought it was some synth patch what you mentioned in your first comment. Then I quickly googled, and found some hamburger thing. x D Only now I see it was coffee! : P
🤔 WAT?
"I’ve reverse-engineered how to accurately reproduce the iconic Tim Horton’s double-double at home"

If it's neither a synth patch, nor hamburger, nor coffee, then what is it???

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bxbrkrz
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Post 21 Oct 2019

bxbrkrz wrote:
18 Oct 2019
Cafe La Llave Espresso :thumbs_up: (smooth for my taste)
Cafe Bustelo Espresso :thumbs_up: (bitter for my taste)
I like to switch them around.
Okay, so maybe I shouldn't give up on espressos, just because my previous machine was bad. Any experience comparing with other coffee types (especially vs. filter)?

This is what I have since April 2018. It is not a machine.
https://gourmetcoffeeusa.com/product/os ... jo-castle/
So far so good. I started drinking coffee 5 years ago maybe. Very limited experience. The only reason I got this one was the handle design. The 'classic vintage' Bialetti design is horrible for me. Too close to the heat, couldn't hold it fully. Not fun.
My next stovetop (after the one I have now eventually brakes) will be stainless steel with a great designed handle (away from the heat, no heat transfer). I like the simple stovetop design.

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guitfnky
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Post 21 Oct 2019

RobC wrote:
21 Oct 2019

"I’ve reverse-engineered how to accurately reproduce the iconic Tim Horton’s double-double at home"

If it's neither a synth patch, nor hamburger, nor coffee, then what is it???
it is coffee. 😅

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selig
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Post 22 Oct 2019

Beyond the beans…The smoothest cup of coffee I've made is with a reverse siphon system, second best with air-press. Still prefer espresso/latte machines for every day, but a good French press works great too for a slightly different taste experience.

As for additives: heavy cream is tops for me,, whole milk for a good latte, butter for a "bullet-proof" style coffee. IF I add any sweeteners, it's most likely maple syrup (maybe once a month tops, if that).
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aeox
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Post 22 Oct 2019

RobC wrote:
21 Oct 2019
Taking the coffee to the next level: brown sugar.

I only could get cane sugar, which is also just white sugar with stuff added to it afterwards. However, I think I might be able to get true brown sugar - the kind that is like wet sand (doesn't taste like it, though). That stuff is awesome. I had some once.

Of course, the simpler one that I got, adds a little extra to my coffee, too, but I want the real deal!

I also found some quality cream that I'm gonna try next. It's UHT, too, but I don't mind, cause I don't fancy the cow musk that's in 'true milk'. >_<
Try dulce de leche instead of sugar and thank me later :)
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